Cargo Engine Room
Engine Room Noise Generator
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June 20th • Loons have landed!

June 20th • New pictures posted

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Seahorse Power

Follow Oliver Trainor into the bowels of a sea monster. Oliver is a seafarer and engineer on cargo ships. As a fan of myNoise, he kindly offered to take a recording device along on one of his voyages, and to record the noises that form a part of his daily life.

Machinery noises in a cargo ship can be deafening, but with some good hearing protection - or here on myNoise - they can be relaxing. This generator can be used as a powerful noise blocker, assuming you are open to the idea of working (or sleeping?) inside a cargo ship.

Oliver took the trouble to record each piece of machinery separately. Of course, we have the sound of the main engine that drives the propeller and moves the ship through the water, but also smaller ones, like the auxilary engine. This one, coupled to a generator, produces the electricity available aboard.

A whining noise can be heard in the purifier room. It comes from a high-speed centrifuge that is used to remove impurities from the ship's fuel before it is supplied to the engine.

The crackling noise comes from the inert gas generator. Why would one need to use inert gas, in a tanker? Because oil tankers produce flammable vapors when loaded for a voyage. Even when empty of oil, there can still be harmful flammable gases in the hold. These vapors present a great risk of explosion, when mixed with the oxygen in the air. To prevent this, an inert gas - one that does not contain oxygen - is produced on board, and pumped into storage areas where flammable gases are present.

Testimonials - write yours here

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  Many thanks to Oliver! This audio is excellent, brings me back memories of taking naps on long ferry rides.

  Amazed at the Cargo Engine Room sound clips and the level of detail on each sound. I always enjoyed the sound of a rumbling diesel engine but this takes it to the next level knowing that I can have a similar sound and mix it with others. Keep up the good work and thanks for creating this. As with others this helps drown out unwanted office sounds, and when music wont do it this is A+.

  Currently happily drowning out super loud co-worker discussion in the cube behind me. Also, being soothed and finally being able to focus to get work done!

  The feeling this noise makes is indescribable. It's a mixture of soothing, constant relaxation and concentration.

  Enough movement to not put me to sleep at my desk, and the perfect amount of drowning-out to combat my co-worker’s obsession with clearing his throat.

  I saw Oliver's reddit post about this project several months ago and I've been looking forward to it since. It has definitely lived up to the hype! Soothing and great for studying.

  This is truly excellent! It can easily substitute my all-time favourite, the Flying Fortress and the Data Center noises.

  I am so not a machinery-minded kind of girl, so I was surprised at how much I enjoyed sampling the different noises here. Who would have known that an inert gas generator could get me going?

  I find this is one of the best for blocking out office noise.

  This sound is surprisingly and very strangely soothing to me - nice calm background sounds different to white noise that are effective blockers, yet it reminds me of being on something like a Star Destroyer (from Star Wars) in space, out of war and in the calm. This sound has many uses and is oddly inspiring!

  Oddly soothing. I like combining with "Flying Fortress" as it makes me feel as though I am in a Zeppelin of old.

Current Slider Settings

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Clone as Minified Player
Order as an Audio file    

Presets

Propeller ShaftMain EngineGenerator PowerVentilationIgnitionHumming TonesAir Compressor Surprise!

 Tape Speed Control

SlowerFasterShuffle!Reset

Animation Control

Start A B C

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Usage

Each slider controls a particular audio stream. Adjust sliders to taste and mood.

The Animate! button turns the soundscape into an slowly evolving texture. Use this feature if you intend to listen to the generator over a long period of time!

Seahorse Power Follow Oliver Trainor into the bowels of a sea monster. Oliver is a seafarer and engineer on cargo ships. As a fan of myNoise, he kindly offered to take a recording device along on one of his voyages, and to record the noises that form a part of his daily life. Machinery noises in a cargo ship can be deafening, but with some good hearing protection - or here on myNoise - they can be relaxing. This generator can be used as a powerful noise blocker, assuming you are open to the idea of working (or sleeping?) inside a cargo ship. Oliver took the trouble to record each piece of machinery separately. Of course, we have the sound of the main engine that drives the propeller and moves the ship through the water, but also smaller ones, like the auxilary engine. This one, coupled to a generator, produces the electricity available aboard. A whining noise can be heard in the purifier room. It comes from a high-speed centrifuge that is used to remove impurities from the ship's fuel before it is supplied to the engine. The crackling noise comes from the inert gas generator. Why would one need to use inert gas, in a tanker? Because oil tankers produce flammable vapors when loaded for a voyage. Even when empty of oil, there can still be harmful flammable gases in the hold. These vapors present a great risk of explosion, when mixed with the oxygen in the air. To prevent this, an inert gas - one that does not contain oxygen - is produced on board, and pumped into storage areas where flammable gases are present.